Pug breeding and health

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Pug breeding and health



People wishing to buy a Pug still have to pay relatively large sums of money. With serious and trustworthy breeders, a Pug puppy costs between 1300 and 1500 euros. Most of the time, you know that you are investing your money in a good way. Indeed, by turning to a recognized and skilled breeder, you are guaranteed to adopt a Pug in good health and sanity, who will be able to spend long and beautiful years at your side.


It is important to keep in mind that responsible breeders who put the well-being and health of their puppies and their breeding stock first, barely cover their expenses. Appropriate living conditions, pedigree analysis before breeding, regular vaccinations and veterinary check-ups, quality food for the mother and puppies, and a healthy environment for the puppies represent significant costs for breeders.

Some dubious breeders seek to make a quick profit without taking into account the health of the animals. 
They can't give you any indication of the pedigree of the dogs they offer. This is why we advise you not to adopt a Pug "at a low price".
 If you don't want to spend that kind of money, try to go to an animal shelter! Who knows, your ideal companion may be waiting for you there, waiting to find a new home!

Despite the breeders' desire for strong and healthy animals, Carlins still have to fight against certain diseases to which they are predisposed. Many of these diseases have arisen as a result of intensive breeding, due to the fashion phenomenon that this breed has fallen victim to. Because of these physical characteristics, desired for years to correspond to an ideal of beauty, some Carlins still encounter respiratory problems today, since their very short snout tightens the respiratory channels. The pug's famous snoring is often due to a soft palate that is too long. His eyes are often affected by inflammation of the cornea and ulcers.

However, the breeding methods of the last few years, the efforts of the breeders as well as the modification of the breed standard in 2010 give us hope that the number of these diseases will decrease in the next few years.

 

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